Every year, Cheap Car Insurance.com (CCI) comes out with the best states with speed traps, and every year North Dakota ranks as a state where you can put the pedal to the metal. So, you go boy, zoom-zoom.

And it's no shock that if you do get busted speeding, in most municipalities in NoDak, your fine is $1 for every mile above the posted speed limited. You get caught going 35 in a 25, your fine is $10 in Bismarck. In terms of money of your pocket, that's not bad at all.

CCI ranked the best states and worst states for speed traps. At #51, Alaska; #50, North Dakota. Other states where speed traps are not an issue are Mississippi, South Dakota (but not during Sturgis Rally) and Kentucky.

The definition of a speed trap, according to Cheap Car Insurance.com is a stretch of highway or road where the speed limit drops drastically without very much notice. (notice how 80% of the city streets in Bismarck are a 25 mph speed limit? Ridiculous!) And the stretch of I94 between the city limits to the State Street over pass, the State Troopers love that area where the speed drops from 75 to 60. While were at it, going North on 83 (State Street) towards Ride's Auto Sales, another prize area for local yokels to bust you for speeding. (Don't even get me started on town of Lincoln, that is just CRA-CRAZY!!) On another note, I've notice the amount of spaces between posted speed limits in Bismarck. Most speed limit signs are posted as you turn on a certain street or road, and not posted again for a long stretch of road.

The worst states for speed traps are Vermont, New Hampshire and Michigan. You can see the best and worst states here. CCI also made note of the one city in each state as being the worst speed trap city; this award goes to Grand Forks. And the most notable stretch of speed trap highway is Highway 281, near Jamestown.

Sean Gallup/ Getty Images

I am  a bit gun shy publishing this article, it wasn't that log ago I got a visit from Officer Friendly for publishing this speed trap story about a creative speed trap in  Bismarck from April of 2015.

At least with this story, I'm regurgitating facts from another story.

DRIVE SAFE MY FRIEND!

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