There's always an angle- always someone looking to turn a profit on the misery of others...You want me to tell you something you don't already know right?

Well then, how about pink-washing?

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we're halfway through and the massive pink marketing machine is at full throttle.  I don't think I should have so say this- but I will, just so we all understand where I'm at here.  Cancer sucks.  We need to be dedicated to eradicating cancer.  We need to uncover treatments that can improve the quality of life for those who are fighting so hard.  We need to establish support systems to help all who are in that fight. We need to kick cancer's butt- not just in October but all year round.

So we need to know that the support we are showing is going towards resources that support ending cancer not simply making us "aware" of cancer.  Pink-washing is a relatively new term...

There’s been backlash for years now over “pinkwashing” and the commodification of breast cancer. Activists have pointed out that the money trail of allocated funds to cancer research is nearly impossible to track, and survivors have spoken out about how they feel their disease is being exploited in the name of profit

Exploited in the name of profit?  What?

Getty Images

The NFL was thinkin' pink pretty early on...it was a chance to increase apparel sales and entice more women to show interest in the NFL.  Does that make them terrible people?  Not if the moneys used properly.  Which can be hard to verify.."Fake News" CNN reports:

 The program raises money through the sale of pink NFL gear, but it's received criticism from health watchdog groups for the percentage of that money that goes to ACS. Critics also complain that the money isn't used to fund cancer research.

 

A group called Breast Cancer Action has trademarked "Think Before You Pink" and has launched a sort of anti-pink campaign on this website.  Here's some more pink points to ponder.

People promoting pink ARE NOT terrible people....unless they are.

Getting harder to tell.