On August 1, North Dakotans will officially be able to use deadly force against intruders without first retreating.

There is a pretty controversial law going into effect this Sunday. On August 1, North Dakotans will no longer legally have to attempt to retreat before resorting to deadly force during an intrusion. There is the excitement that people can protect themselves by any means necessary. But there is also a fear that people may become "trigger happy."

According to Inforum, deadly force will be permitted in a home or the workplace "to prevent a violent felony in public or any other place a person is legally permitted to be." Advocates are happy that people have more rights for their own personal protection and opponents are reportedly afraid to open "the door to false claims of self-defense by bad actors." But do we really need to worry that people are just going to start shooting up anyone and everyone?

Gun-related homicide is statistically higher in states with stand your ground laws.

According to gun safety website Everytown, because of stand your ground laws, the United States experiences 150 more deaths per month than it would if such laws did not exist. And the concern is that stand your ground laws make it way easy to shoot someone and claim it was self-defense, no matter what the circumstances were that lead to a shooting. So, statistically, gun death is likely to increase in North Dakota, but it is a god-given right to protect your own life.

Why should people have to retreat from violent attacks?

Though I am no "card carryin' member of the NRA," I do agree that a person should be able to protect themselves and others at all costs. It is not possible to stop all crime, and it is not always possible to get immediate help when in danger. Violence and murder will happen no matter what. It sucks. But the average person should not be legally obligated to flee a dangerous situation. Especially on their own domain.

LOOK: What major laws were passed the year you were born?

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